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Photo by Maria Oswalt on Unsplash

The American Judicial System is one of the most flawed systems our world has ever seen. The main issue lies within our punishment system fueling off of racial bias and ingrained discrimination. This system has always been flawed, but if we begin to shift the focus onto the mercy of our courts as opposed to the representatives, such as police officers, then our prison system’s merit would immensely increase, while also improving the issue of our nation’s ingrained racism.

Thinking back to the Cyntoia Brown case of 2004, we see a class act of racial bias and predisposed laws. Cyntoia was just sixteen when she was sexually abused by a middle-aged white man who held status in the community. She knew that if she were harmed, she would go missing and forgotten — no one would know whose bed she was lying in, dead and cold, so she shot him in self-defense. At the age of eighteen, she was found guilty to first-degree murder and multiple other serious felonies, which resulted in a sentence to life in prison, with no chance of parole. In 2004, this was a case about a biracial sex worker killing a white man to gain a few extra dollars. In 2020, it is evident that this was a child who endured serious sexual abuse by predators, while only trying to protect herself. It took fifteen years of incarceration and her legal team fighting her sentencing for Cyntoia to finally be granted clemency. …

A sappy reflection on LSU’s National Championship win.

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Photographer: Abby Kibler

My earliest memory is the same story as my need for glasses: a careless scratch to the eye at an LSU tailgate party, while I laid on the ground sobbing as boozed old men towered over me, frantically searching for the nearest beverage that wasn’t beer to flush my eyes out. My vision has, somewhat laughably, become progressively worse as the years go by — bearing me embarrassingly thick lenses and “oh my god, you’re so blind!” remarks from friends sitting next to me upon realization of my poor eyesight. …

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Mikail Çiftçi

A PSA to teens in regard to our overconsumption of tech.

A few days ago, I sat down to read a novel, an activity that I’ve enjoyed for a large portion of my life. I picked up Ghachar Ghochar by Vivek Shanbhag and was three pages in before I realized that I had my phone in my hand, mindlessly scrolling through memes on Twitter. My warped behavior and frenzied headspace embodied the rise of modern-day tech and how our dependence upon it affects our manner of thinking.

I recently finished reading Nicholas Carr’s The Shallows, which began to offer an explanation for my predicament. Dozens of studies conducted by highly educated individuals prove that going online promotes cursory reading, hurried and distracted thinking, and superficial learning. Our online usage has quite literally changed the way that we think, in such a sense that our brains have adapted to always remain in a hyperactive state, which consequently prompts us to always crave something next — something to like, something to comment on, and something to share. …

And it involves white supremacist terrorism.

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The nation’s eyes are fixated upon Texas today. Twenty-two people died, and more than two dozen were wounded inside an El Paso Walmart — making this the eighth deadliest mass shooting in American history.

The most chilling piece of information available as of now is a four-page manifesto essay (allegedly) written by the shooter. There isn’t any need to read this, though, as the exact themes, words, and motives can all be found within Donald Trump’s campaign rallies.

The main motivator to commit mass murder was in “response to [the] Hispanic invasion of Texas.” The gunman drove nine hours to get to El Paso — giving him plenty of time to reconsider — and plotted this attack for weeks. …

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Men: Women are so insensitive. Stop being such snowflakes!

Gillette: Men, we can be better.

Men: THAT’S SO INSULTING. ARE YOU GENERALIZING ALL MEN AS CONTRIBUTORS TO TOXIC MASCULINITY? I’M THE BEST I ALREADY CAN BE. BOYCOTT GILLETTE.

Gillette released a short film four days ago, and it already has racked up 19,000,000 views, 500,000 likes, and 940,000 dislikes. If you’ve been living under a rock lately and somehow haven’t seen the video or the controversial uproar about it, I’d suggest you take a look first.

Gillette’s new short film addresses topics like sexual harassment, bullying, and toxic masculinity to prompt a change in today’s society — specifically, to encourage men to “be the best they can be.” …

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Moving away from Louisiana — the small adjustments.

My only regret about moving to Texas was leaving behind all of my beloved Cajun traditions and culture. My family and I try to make trips down to Louisiana as often as we can, and because we still have doctors that we have yet to change and friends too close to forget about, it makes the occurrence of these trips a little easier. This week, we took a trip down to my former home, Lafayette, Louisiana, and I could not help but think of all the minor things that I either had to adjust to, I noticed, or merely missed. …

About

Makayla

living and loving jesus, books, coffee, leadership, and music curation.

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